d Question: A performer in a circus is fired from a cannon as a “human cannonball” and leaves the cannon with a speed of 16.4 m/s. The performer’s mass is 82.6 kg. The cannon barrel is 9.29 m long. Find the average net force exerted on the performer while he is being accelerated inside the cannon. | Job Exam Rare Mathematics (JEMrare) - Solved MCQs
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Question: A performer in a circus is fired from a cannon as a “human cannonball” and leaves the cannon with a speed of 16.4 m/s. The performer’s mass is 82.6 kg. The cannon barrel is 9.29 m long. Find the average net force exerted on the performer while he is being accelerated inside the cannon.

Question: A performer in a circus is fired from a cannon as a “human cannonball” and leaves the cannon with a speed of 16.4 m/s. The performer’s mass is 82.6 kg. The cannon barrel is 9.29 m long. Find the average net force exerted on the performer while he is being accelerated inside the cannon.
Solution:
Here we have the data;
Velocity or speed of “human cannonball” = 16.4 m/s
Mass of the “human cannonball” = 82.6 kg
Length of cannon barrel =S= 9.29 m
Net force =F= ?


We know formula for force is
F=ma
Where F is force and m is mass and ‘a’ is acceleration.
So if we see given data – the only thing we do not have is the value of acceleration i-e ‘a’
If we can find ‘a’ then we can calculate force F.
To find ‘a’ we use formula;
2aS=Vf ^{2}-Vi ^{2} --(2)
Where,
S= is length of the cannon barrel = 9.29 m
Vi= Initial velocity of the actor before firing = 0 m/s
Vf = Velocity of the actor when he comes out of cannon barrel after being fired= 16.4 m/s
putting these values in the formula
\Rightarrow 2aS=Vf ^{2}-Vi ^{2}
\Right 2a\times 9.29= 16.4^{2}-0 ^{2}
\Rightarrow 18.58a= 16.4\times16.4
\Right a= \frac{16.4\times16.4}{18.58}
\Right a= 14.475780409
Now we can use this value of ‘a’ in formula F=ma to calculate net force;
F=ma
F=82.6\times 14.475780409
F=1195.7N
F=1195.699461783 N
So, the net force is  1195.7N
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